Appaloosa

One of the distinctive American horse breeds is the Appaloosa. The breed is noted for the extremely variable patterns of spots on its coat. For example, a leopard pattern is dark spots over the body of a white horse, and the snowflake pattern is white spots over the body of a dark horse. Horses, which evolved in North America, became extinct and only returned when brought to Mexico by the Spanish. Horses spread north from Mexico, forever altering the cultures of many tribal peoples. One such people were the Nez Perce, living in the Northwest, who were hunter gatherers and fishers before obtaining horses. They rapidly became a people highly skilled in horsemanship. They developed a strain of horses characterized by spots, which came to be known as Appaloosa. Meriwether Lewis, on the Lewis and Clark expedition, in 1806 noted the tribe and their spotted horses. Much later that century, settlers wanted Nez Perce lands, and the tribe rebelled. They decided to flee to Canada, in a remarkable trek called the Nez Perce War (1877). They were pursued by the US Army, and eventually forced to surrender. The army confiscated or shot the Nez Perce horses, and it is remarkable the Appaloosas survived. The current popularity of the breed comes from the appeal of the breed itself and the connection with the story of Nez Perce resistance.

           bb              UWANABE is a search engine portal for all the resources you need to be anything UWANABE
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T ULETT V W X Y Z